What is the downside to a Pro 1000?

For discussion, question and answers regarding Pro 1000 presses

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Trinidad Bill
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Joined: Mon Jul 19, 2010 5:35 pm

What is the downside to a Pro 1000?

Postby Trinidad Bill » Thu Feb 24, 2011 12:05 pm

What is the downside to a Pro 1000?

I have two LoadMasters and one Pro 1000. When I use the Pro 1000 I marvel at its simplicity and ability to re-load cartridges, fast and efficiently.

I really have no complaints on the LoadMaster I just have to tinker with it a bit more to keep it running.

To me the priming system on the Pro 1000 is far less complicated and hence has fewer issues for me than the LoadMaster.

The shell plate is rock solid and does not loosen. Yes it is a pain to change but… not that bad.

I have 5 dies in the LoadMaster one of which is there to help the priming system stay lined up. There are only 3 dies in the Pro 1000 and they all do a job. The force required to actuate 5 dies is obviously more than 3 dies. Hence I believe the Pro 1000 operates much easier.

The case feeder on the Pro 1000 is simple and it just works. I do not use the case feeder on the LoadMaster as it is more complicated.

I use both but my preference for simplicity draws me to the Pro 1000.

Am I missing something?

gnauenburg
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Joined: Fri Sep 03, 2010 8:55 pm
Location: Riverside, CA

Postby gnauenburg » Thu Feb 24, 2011 1:13 pm

Trinidad,

I have to say that my biggest issue with the Pro 1000 was the caliber changes. Unless you had a carrier for each shell plate I found that all the little parts under the shell plate could be a PITA to deal with. I have fat fingers. I also did not like that it didn't work well when ejecting rounds. The whole chute design was a bit off. Then there is the spent primer issue. They should have stated that a hole should be cut into the benchtop under the press to keep the thing from binding up. Other than those issues I really thought it was a great press. I agree with you that the case feeder worked better on the 1000 than the LM does. I suppose the lock of a fourth station for those that feel it necessary to crimp in a seperate operation would be the biggest knock somebody could put on it. I think that if I were going to make one major change to this press it would be to create a chute in the base of the press that has an exit hole to the left or right and a tube with a canister to capture spent primers. To me this is all the thing needs to be the best choice for a pistol only reloading press. I love my LM and this is now my only press but like you I find it hard to really extremely critical abouit the Pro 1000. It is a very good press IMHO.

George

Trinidad Bill
Posts: 71
Joined: Mon Jul 19, 2010 5:35 pm

Postby Trinidad Bill » Thu Feb 24, 2011 1:50 pm

George...

I forgot about the spent primers! Out of sight, out of mind. I had better remember to unbolt the press and clean it out before it becomes a problem. Thanks for the reminder.

I also thought not having a crimp die was an issue. But for the pistol rounds I load the bullet seat/crimp die seems to do a good job (once I learned how to set the crimp correctly!).

I agree, the ramp does not work well. I just let them pile up and they eventually fall. I do recall that when I first started using the Pro 1000 the ramp worked fine. I remember thinking what is all the talk about. Then it started getting sticky. Might have something to do with the power reacting with the aluminum. I might try to wax the chute, maybe that will help.

gnauenburg
Posts: 48
Joined: Fri Sep 03, 2010 8:55 pm
Location: Riverside, CA

Postby gnauenburg » Thu Feb 24, 2011 3:25 pm

If you polish that shute some it will work very well. Just a suggestion for the spent primers. If you bore a hole under your press and then take an empty jar with a lid and cut a hole in the lid then screw than in place under the hole you will never have to unbolt your press again. Just ensure you have a decent size hole under there and the jar will keep you from having much of a mess. You screw the jar something like an empty mayo jar into the lid and then when the primers build up in there just unscrew it and dump the spent primers in the trash. It really worked well for me.

Trinidad Bill
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Postby Trinidad Bill » Thu Feb 24, 2011 4:38 pm

Great idea with the jar! Unfortunately mine is sitting on a 1/4" plate of steel!

I did polish the ramp with some Lee case lube and...the new cartridges slid down the ramp just fine.

zuke

Postby zuke » Thu Feb 24, 2011 4:53 pm

Great idea with the jar! Unfortunately mine is sitting on a 1/4" plate of steel!
Drill a 1/2 inch hole in it.
It wont hurt,trust me.

Horseman
Posts: 411
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Postby Horseman » Sat Mar 26, 2011 11:36 pm

The only downsides to the pro 1000 is it's basically for pistol calibers, the spent primer system sucks, and that it only has three die positions. If it had 4 stations and a decent primer disposal I would much prefer it over the Loadmaster as I load my rifle cartridges on a single stage. I also believe it would be by far the best selling progressive press on the market.

Trinidad Bill
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Joined: Mon Jul 19, 2010 5:35 pm

Postby Trinidad Bill » Sun Mar 27, 2011 9:03 pm

Horseman...

Just out of curiosity what do you need the fourth position for?

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darwin
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Postby darwin » Mon Mar 28, 2011 10:12 am

Trinidad Bill wrote:Horseman...

Just out of curiosity what do you need the fourth position for?


In my case, the Factory Crimp Die.

Trinidad Bill
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Postby Trinidad Bill » Mon Mar 28, 2011 6:23 pm

darwin wrote:
Trinidad Bill wrote:Horseman...

Just out of curiosity what do you need the fourth position for?


In my case, the Factory Crimp Die.


That is what I always thought but... for my loads I have found that the bullet seat/crimp die work just great for me. I had to learn how to set the crimp with the seating die. Once I figured that out, I was off and running!

Is there something inherently wrong with the crimp provided by the seating die? I have used both the FCD and the bullet seat/crimp, both work equally well for me.

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uniquedot
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Postby uniquedot » Mon Mar 28, 2011 10:21 pm

Trinidad Bill wrote:
darwin wrote:
Trinidad Bill wrote:Horseman...

Just out of curiosity what do you need the fourth position for?


In my case, the Factory Crimp Die.


That is what I always thought but... for my loads I have found that the bullet seat/crimp die work just great for me. I had to learn how to set the crimp with the seating die. Once I figured that out, I was off and running!

Is there something inherently wrong with the crimp provided by the seating die? I have used both the FCD and the bullet seat/crimp, both work equally well for me.


There is nothing wrong with the standard die and in fact it's the best choice for cast bullets. The main reason i changed from the pro to the loadmaster was because it would do more rifle calibers and i liked the upstroke priming feature.

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darwin
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Postby darwin » Mon Mar 28, 2011 11:55 pm

I think that the regular crimp works better for lead bullets and/or revolvers. The FCH works better for FMJ bullets and/or autos. FCD dies are aeasier to set up.

kcbrown
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Postby kcbrown » Tue Mar 29, 2011 11:56 am

Trinidad Bill wrote:Great idea with the jar! Unfortunately mine is sitting on a 1/4" plate of steel!

I did polish the ramp with some Lee case lube and...the new cartridges slid down the ramp just fine.



You don't need to drill a hole in your steel plate.

Instead, mount your press on top of some 1 inch standoffs (so that the standoffs are between your steel plate and your press), then slide a square bin underneath the press. The bin will catch the primers and will make it easy to dispense of them.

You might have to fabricate the bin. I just cut off and used the bottom part of one of these: http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/de ... ber=446469
Last edited by kcbrown on Tue Mar 29, 2011 12:24 pm, edited 2 times in total.

kcbrown
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Re: What is the downside to a Pro 1000?

Postby kcbrown » Tue Mar 29, 2011 12:11 pm

Trinidad Bill wrote:What is the downside to a Pro 1000?

I have two LoadMasters and one Pro 1000. When I use the Pro 1000 I marvel at its simplicity and ability to re-load cartridges, fast and efficiently.

I really have no complaints on the LoadMaster I just have to tinker with it a bit more to keep it running.

To me the priming system on the Pro 1000 is far less complicated and hence has fewer issues for me than the LoadMaster.

The shell plate is rock solid and does not loosen. Yes it is a pain to change but… not that bad.

I have 5 dies in the LoadMaster one of which is there to help the priming system stay lined up. There are only 3 dies in the Pro 1000 and they all do a job. The force required to actuate 5 dies is obviously more than 3 dies. Hence I believe the Pro 1000 operates much easier.

The case feeder on the Pro 1000 is simple and it just works. I do not use the case feeder on the LoadMaster as it is more complicated.

I use both but my preference for simplicity draws me to the Pro 1000.

Am I missing something?


Nope, you pretty much nailed it. The only thing the Pro 1000 lacks is stations. It has enough for the basics, and that suits its character just fine.

I, too, am leaning towards my Pro 1000. I have it and my Loadmaster set up side by side, both set up to do 9mm. But I have to go through some extra effort on the Loadmaster to get it to make rounds reliably. For instance, I have to use two seating and crimping dies to ensure that my OAL is within specs, because a crushed primer will prevent the ram from raising all the way up and thus prevent the seating station from properly sizing the round that's there at the time.

I rarely have crushed primers with the Pro 1000, and when I do it's almost always because I'm on the last few primers and I blew the technique to push the primer into place (I use a zip tie to push the primers down the chute when there's no longer enough of them to do the job through gravity, and there's a technique to it). But even when I do, it doesn't affect the upstroke of the ram, so I get consistent OALs out of the press regardless (well, as consistent as mixed brass will allow).


My only complaint about the Pro 1000 is that I'd prefer its linkage to be a bit sturdier and more precise. But I'm comparing it to my Dillon 650, which isn't a fair comparison at all. I suspect that if it had the same linkage as the Classic Turret, it would feel rock solid.

Trinidad Bill
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Joined: Mon Jul 19, 2010 5:35 pm

Postby Trinidad Bill » Tue Mar 29, 2011 7:41 pm

KCBrown...

I feel the same way! BTW thanks for the tip on the standoffs and tray. That is a great idea.


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