proper crimp for 45ACP

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johnmilleriii
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proper crimp for 45ACP

Postby johnmilleriii » Wed Oct 14, 2009 9:41 pm

I'm trying to determine how much crimp is enough. I'm using the pro1000 with carbide fcd. I've adjusted as explained in the modern reloading book. Does anyone have a suggestion on how to determine if there is enough or too much crimp?
Thanks, John

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Jumping Frog
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Re: proper crimp for 45ACP

Postby Jumping Frog » Wed Oct 14, 2009 11:24 pm

johnmilleriii wrote:I'm trying to determine how much crimp is enough.

Basically, you only need enough crimp to remove the belling you added to insert the bullet, plus maybe just a touch more. Somewhere around .471-.472 works fine. There should be no visible inward crimp.

Here is a picture of some good crimps: Pic Link

johnmilleriii
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Postby johnmilleriii » Sat Oct 17, 2009 11:33 pm

Thanks for the advice. I'm not able view the pic you posted the link for.

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Jumping Frog
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Postby Jumping Frog » Sun Oct 18, 2009 10:02 am

My original link was to a different forum. Maybe you have to be signed in for the link to work. Anyway, this will work better:

Image

at_liberty
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Postby at_liberty » Mon Aug 16, 2010 9:23 am

In reviewing these threads, I have to ask how an FCD would fit on or be relevant to a 3-station Pro1000?

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darwin
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Postby darwin » Mon Aug 16, 2010 9:42 am

When I had a Pro1000, I primed with a hand primer just so that I could use the FCD in the press.

at_liberty
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Postby at_liberty » Mon Aug 16, 2010 10:22 am

darwin wrote:When I had a Pro1000, I primed with a hand primer just so that I could use the FCD in the press.


In looking at the press, it would seem that the first station would have to be powder drop in a case that had already been sized. Then placing a bullet right handed would require a lever on the off side. The bullet feeder, if any, would solve that but be moved to the second station.

I suspect one would do just as well, assuming he had priming down pretty well on this press, to use the FCD as a follow up operation on a single stage. I am doing that now on 9mm, getting better results with a light taper crimp than relying on the bullet seating die combination.

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Postby Trinidad Bill » Mon Aug 16, 2010 2:40 pm

I posted a similar crimp problem under the LoadMaster forum. I had a problem cycling my 45acp reloads through my Lone Wolf barrel. Lack of enough crimp was causing the case to hang up going into the barrel with large capacity magazines. I have my FCD set to the top of an empty case + 1/2 turn. This seems to be enough crimp such that my reloads cycle properly.

You should be able to measure your crimp but... I have not done so. My crimp is visable

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Jumping Frog
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Postby Jumping Frog » Tue Aug 17, 2010 10:40 am

A normal .45 ACP seating and crimping die can be used to both seat the bullet and apply the crimp in one step when on a three stage PRO-1000.

There is really no requirement to use the FCD to get good useful ammunition.

at_liberty
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Postby at_liberty » Tue Aug 17, 2010 10:57 am

Jumping Frog wrote:A normal .45 ACP seating and crimping die can be used to both seat the bullet and apply the crimp in one step when on a three stage PRO-1000.

There is really no requirement to use the FCD to get good useful ammunition.


My experience was that a light crimp was required to avoid crushing the case before the bullet was completely seated. That was not enough crimp, or the adjustment was just too critical and hard to determine. Life is easier and the crimp more secure when crimping is a separate operation, the bullet already fully seated. I have found that some cartridges from other sources, most likely not including an FCD, would not fully go in a gauge until I ran them on the FCD, then no problem,

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Jumping Frog
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Postby Jumping Frog » Tue Aug 17, 2010 11:57 am

at_liberty wrote:Life is easier and the crimp more secure when crimping is a separate operation, the bullet already fully seated.

I agree that separating it into two operations is easier -- that is one reason I got the 5-station Loadmaster instead of the Pro-1000

at_liberty wrote:I have found that some cartridges from other sources, most likely not including an FCD, would not fully go in a gauge until I ran them on the FCD, then no problem,

On the other hand, you know how many millions (literally) of .45 ACP rounds have been reloaded using a traditional seating/crimping die from Lyman, RCBS, Redding, Hornady, Star, Dillon, etc. This ain't rocket science.

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Postby at_liberty » Tue Aug 17, 2010 12:40 pm

Jumping Frog wrote:
at_liberty wrote:Life is easier and the crimp more secure when crimping is a separate operation, the bullet already fully seated.

I agree that separating it into two operations is easier -- that is one reason I got the 5-station Loadmaster instead of the Pro-1000

at_liberty wrote:I have found that some cartridges from other sources, most likely not including an FCD, would not fully go in a gauge until I ran them on the FCD, then no problem,

On the other hand, you know how many millions (literally) of .45 ACP rounds have been reloaded using a traditional seating/crimping die from Lyman, RCBS, Redding, Hornady, Star, Dillon, etc. This ain't rocket science.


Actually, I think it was sufficiently problematic that seating and crimping were separate. It is the turrets and progressives that try to compress every operation into a minimum number of stations.

Lastly, I would say that the FCD was not a solution in search of a problem. There was genuine demand for it. I am not finding it at all easy to get along without it, so I picture these old timers doing a lot of manual recycles, trying to clear FTF rounds.

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Postby Horseman » Tue Sep 21, 2010 1:16 pm

It's not a "needed" die for reloading. I do like them for rifle applications, but the rifle die just has a collet to crimp the bullet and there is no swaging done. The carbide factory crimp die can be a problem if you want to load oversized cast bullets in handguns. A seater/crimp die will work fine if properly adjusted and has for many, many years. If you're getting bulges in your cases to where you need the FCD to swage them down to feed into your guns, more than likely there are some other issues involved. Basically the carbide insert "swager" is the only difference between the two types. They both give the same type of crimp ie; taper or roll. To the original question, a half turn should be plenty.

zuke

Postby zuke » Tue Sep 21, 2010 3:41 pm

I like to use the seating die to remove the belling and get crimp started.
Then use the FCD to finish the job.

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Postby Horseman » Wed Nov 03, 2010 8:32 pm

Or you could just screw your seating die in another 1/4 turn and have the same crimp.


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