Need desperate help with a Lee Pro 1000... anyone??

For discussion, question and answers regarding Pro 1000 presses

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ecorrigan
Posts: 5
Joined: Fri Feb 19, 2010 6:12 am

Need desperate help with a Lee Pro 1000... anyone??

Postby ecorrigan » Sun Feb 21, 2010 9:08 pm

Okay, I'm in a bind and need some help.
I received a Pro 1000 from a friend (mistake #1) and was told when it was given to me that I needed to replace a thing or two on it. The biggest thing that I need to replace is the Primer Trough.
If anyone out there can give me easy 'idiot-proof' instructions on how to do this I would greatly appreciate it. I can't use the press until I get that one thing replaced. I've got everything I need to get it up and running. I just can't figure out how in the world to get this one piece replaced.
Help me please...

prs
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Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2010 8:44 pm

Postby prs » Sun Feb 21, 2010 9:40 pm

I do not own and have not even seen a Pro 1000 in operation but refer to:

http://www.leeprecision.com/cgi-data/in ... TR2441.pdf

Looks like the primer feed is connected to the shell plate.

prs

ecorrigan
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Joined: Fri Feb 19, 2010 6:12 am

Postby ecorrigan » Mon Feb 22, 2010 10:31 am

I've got a copy of the instructions right next to my computer. They're a little more clear in person than they are on the 'net but it's still confusing. The Primer Trough is separate from the Base but I still don't know how to change it out. I think I might be spending some time on the phone with Lee Customer Service to see if they can talk me through it...
Wish me luck! I'm the type of person that almost has to have it shown to me in order to know how to do something like that.

kcbrown
Posts: 96
Joined: Tue Jan 05, 2010 8:55 pm

Postby kcbrown » Mon Feb 22, 2010 10:36 am

To replace the primer trough, you'll need to remove and disassemble the shellplate carrier (more precisely, remove the shellplate).

Removal is just a question of raising the ram to about 2/3 up, then loosening the hex bolt on the underside of the carrier that secures it to the ram and then lowering the ram (or, if it's "stuck", placing something solid underneath the carrier first before lowering the ram).

Note that you want the underside of the carrier to be above the twisted portion of the indexing rod when you separate it from the ram. If it comes off as the ram was 2/3 of the way up, then it'll be easily clear of the twisted part of the indexing rod.

Anyway, after separating the carrier from the ram, remove the turret. Now swing the bottom of the indexing rod towards the left rear of the press in order to remove the carrier from the press.

Now pull the indexing rod out of the carrier from the underside of the carrier.

The shellplate should be positioned with the locating ball underneath one of the cutouts, the way it would be right before you raise the ram. Place a 3/16" hex wrench through the station #1 shellplate cutout and into the hole underneath (where the spent primers drop through during decapping/sizing) so that two opposite flats are facing left and right. Now, using a 1/4" hex wrench, turn the shellplate indexing bolt (that is in the center of the shellplate) clockwise. Do it gently. After it "breaks free" you should be able to turn it by hand. It should not require a whole lot of force to break it free, so DO NOT use a lot of force. Too much force tends to bend and break things.

You may need to move the case sensor out of the way a bit in order to completely unscrew the shellplate from the indexing bolt. I highly recommend you do all this over a large container of some kind so that if parts come loose you won't lose them. Be mindful of the indexing ball and the spring underneath. You should keep the entire assembly upright while removing the shellplate.

Once the shellplate is removed, you should be able to remove the primer trough. there is a spring underneath if I remember correctly, so be careful not to lose it.

Assembly is more or less the reverse of disassembly: to put the shellplate back on you want to rotate the indexing bolt counterclockwise (which would be the same effect as rotating the shellplate onto the bolt clockwise). You should see just a little bit of the indexing bolt's thread at the top of the shellplate when it's snug or nearly so. Snug it by hand. You can snug it relatively tightly by hand but I do not recommend you use the 1/4" hex wrench for tightening it any further unless you are very aware of how much force you're applying -- it doesn't need to be a great deal, just enough to keep the bolt from inadvertently coming loose. Remember that a normal indexing operation has the bolt moving counterclockwise and turning the shellplate in that direction -- which tightens the bolt against the shellplate.

Place the indexing rod into the carrier from the underside, with the flat end of the rod going in first. Be mindful of the hex shape of the hole in the nylon hex ratchet into which you're placing the indexing rod -- you want to feed the rod into that hole with the flats in the same locations. Once you've fed it through, you may have to rotate the shellplate and the indexing bolt in order to get the hole at the top of the indexing bolt to line up with the hex shape of the indexing rod.

Place the rod in such a way that the carrier is about 2/3 of the way up it. Now you can put the assembly back into the press. Insert the assembly from the left rear of the press. Lead with the indexing trough and place the pin that stick out of it just behind the post with the indentations in it. Now rotate the assembly into place. The bottom of the indexing rod should be on the pad near the center of the press.

You should now be able to raise the ram into the carrier and tighten the hex bolt that secures the carrier to the ram.

And you're done!



Hope this helps, and I really hope I didn't miss anything...

kcbrown
Posts: 96
Joined: Tue Jan 05, 2010 8:55 pm

Postby kcbrown » Mon Feb 22, 2010 10:40 am

ecorrigan wrote:I've got a copy of the instructions right next to my computer. They're a little more clear in person than they are on the 'net but it's still confusing. The Primer Trough is separate from the Base but I still don't know how to change it out. I think I might be spending some time on the phone with Lee Customer Service to see if they can talk me through it...
Wish me luck! I'm the type of person that almost has to have it shown to me in order to know how to do something like that.


If you've got the shellplate off, the primer trough should slide right out if I remember right.

ecorrigan
Posts: 5
Joined: Fri Feb 19, 2010 6:12 am

Postby ecorrigan » Mon Feb 22, 2010 9:14 pm

kcbrown, your instructions were a heck of a lot clearer than the ones in the packaging for the press. I got it figured out in just a matter of minutes after I actually looked at it and realized what you were instructing me to do. Now I'm elated and I'm looking forward to using it.
I've just gotta wait for the dies that are coming in the mail and I'll be ready to go!
Thank you so much for helping out a progressive press 'virgin'. I can't wait to use it!!

kcbrown
Posts: 96
Joined: Tue Jan 05, 2010 8:55 pm

Postby kcbrown » Tue Feb 23, 2010 12:04 am

ecorrigan wrote:kcbrown, your instructions were a heck of a lot clearer than the ones in the packaging for the press. I got it figured out in just a matter of minutes after I actually looked at it and realized what you were instructing me to do. Now I'm elated and I'm looking forward to using it.
I've just gotta wait for the dies that are coming in the mail and I'll be ready to go!
Thank you so much for helping out a progressive press 'virgin'. I can't wait to use it!!


You're very welcome! It's a good little press. Just be gentle with it and take your time, and make sure you have it mounted to something absolutely solid. The key to operating the Lee progressives with minimal fuss is to mount them so that they do not move when you operate them. Only the movements they were designed for should occur.

One other thing: the indexing setting that Lee has you do will get you approximately there but not absolutely there. There are a couple of things you need to do to ensure that you get reliable operation of the press:
  • Make absolutely sure there is no forwards or backwards movement of the indexing adjustment screw possible. In my experience, even a tiny amount of free play there can result in the shellplate indexing only halfway. If there is free play, loosen the cover and position it so that the indexing screw cannot move forwards/backwards, then tighten it back up.
  • Make the indexing adjustment using the method Lee recommends, but go the minimum number of turns they recommend. Cycle the press (which should result in the shellplate "snapping" into position) and after doing so, apply some pressure to the shellplate clockwise while peering down vertically at the priming pin (this is best done with an empty turret on top so you can position yourself properly with some accuracy -- the pin should appear to be in the center of the turret hole). If the indexing is set properly, there should be hardly any possible movement of the shellplate backwards relative to when the priming pin is perfectly centered in the shellplate cutout. If there is, turn the index adjustment screw clockwise in very small amounts until the slack is almost completely gone. Cycle the press multiple times and check the slack and positioning on each cycle. If you've turned the index adjustment too far, the shellplate will advance a little too far and the priming pin won't be centered properly. Just cycle the press again but stop lowering the ram just before the bottom of the shellplate descends below the primer pin -- you want the shellplate to be just above that pin so that it can rotate past it. Then turn the index adjustment clockwise to rotate the shellplate to the next position and start the adjustment process over again. ETA: Note that the indexing mechanism engages on ram downwards motion. If you raise the ram, the indexing mechanism will disengage. Since the indexing adjustment depends on the mechanism being engaged, be mindful of this.
  • Always make sure the primer trough is full. The primer feeding mechanism relies on gravity and, in particular, the force of the primers stacked up in the trough to properly move the next primer into position over the priming pin. Making use of those last few primers that occupy the trough when the primer tray has emptied is difficult and takes a deft touch. If you're willing to leave primers in the system, you're probably better off leaving them in the trough for the next reloading session. I'd cover the whole thing up with something to prevent dirt and dust from getting into the system, since it's quite sensitive to that.


The Pro 1000 is an incredibly simple design (I'm particularly fond of the casefeeder), so with a solid understanding of how and why it works, it should give you good reliability.
Last edited by kcbrown on Tue Feb 23, 2010 10:45 am, edited 1 time in total.

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darwin
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Postby darwin » Tue Feb 23, 2010 12:55 am

I think that I remember the case feeder is much better and simpler than the one on the Load Master. That and priming at the bottom of the stroke are two advantages the P1K has over the LM. The 3 die limit was a killer for me, though.

ecorrigan
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Joined: Fri Feb 19, 2010 6:12 am

Postby ecorrigan » Wed Feb 24, 2010 7:34 pm

Okay now, another question....
Do I need to have a spring on the chain for the powder measure? I've been playing around with the press, minus the primer, powder and bullets, and it works just as good. I'm thinking it doesn't need it but I'd like to confirm it through Lee first though before I actually complete any cartridges in it. I figure it's safer to get the manufacturers opinion.

Let me know what y'all think.

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darwin
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Postby darwin » Wed Feb 24, 2010 7:39 pm

I don't remember my P1000 that well, but I am going to assume that the powder measure is set up the same way as it is on the Load Master. If I am wrong, someone please jump in and correct me.


Yes you DO need a small spring at the bottom of the chain. This ensures that the chain is pulled tightly enough to completely re-set the powder measure and that the chain won't be likely to break.

When you put the chain through the outer hole, you pull it tight, then raise the chain and it will click. Then you lower the ram to pull the chain tight and as you pull it tight it will click again.

ecorrigan
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Joined: Fri Feb 19, 2010 6:12 am

Postby ecorrigan » Wed Feb 24, 2010 8:10 pm

I remember talking to a guy a Lee a while ago and he said it doesn't need it under a certain circumstance but I don't remember what those circumstances are. That's why, like I said, I'm going to have to contact Lee tomorrow and ask them about it.
I'm getting so close to using this thing and I'm getting excited. My bullets are coming in the mail and I've got everything else. I'm getting anxious as heck!!

vdsgw
Posts: 19
Joined: Sun Oct 18, 2009 2:19 am

Postby vdsgw » Mon Mar 08, 2010 12:04 pm

The early P1000 came with a spring loaded return on the powder hopper. The new ones come with the chain pull return. If you have the older one you can buy the update kit it is safer. Make sure you get the small peice at the bottom of the carrier to attatch the bottom of the chain to. Also lube your ram and tighten the hex screw which holds the ram to the carrier.


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